Sep 22

Op-ed: Why We Continue to AIDS Walk -

Study: Religions' Acceptance of Gays and Lesbians Increases -

Artists Battle Transphobia in Argentina -

(Source: tipsfortransfolks, via lgbtqblogs)

Ways to be an Ally to Non-Monosexual/Bisexual People -

candiedbinicorn:

The ideas in this pamphlet were generated during a discussion at a UC Davis Bi Visibility Project group meeting and were compiled Winter quarter, 2009.

Nonmonosexual / bisexual individuals self-identify in a variety of different ways – please keep in mind that though this pamphlet gives suggestions about how to be a good ally, one of the most important aspects of being an ally is respecting individual’s decisions about self-identification. There are hundreds of ways to be a good ally – Please use these suggestions as a starting point, and seek additional resources!

In this pamphlet the terms “bisexual” and “nonmonosexual” will be used interchangeably to describe individuals who identify with nonmonosexual orientations (attracted to more than one gender), encompassing pan-, omni-, ambi-, bi-, and nonmonosexual identities. Respect personal choices about self-identification and use specific terms on an individual basis.

Monosexism: A belief that monosexuality (either exclusive heterosexuality and/or being lesbian or gay) is superior to a bisexual or pansexual orientation.

Try...

Don’t assume…

… You can only be a bi ally I you know people who are bi - Going to events, talking in gender-neutral terms, or being inclusive of bi sexualities speaks volumes to people of any sexual orientation.

… All people who are nonmonosexual are sexual or have had “all” kinds of sex. Not all have had experiences with different genders; no one person will necessarily have had experiences of any specific kind.

… All people who are nonmonosexual are gender conforming. Gender and sexuality are separate and do not depend on each other.

…Someone’s sexual orientation is based on the gender of their partner(s).

… All people who are bi are heteronormative or homonormative.

… How a person who is nonmonosexual defines “virginity.”

… All people who are nonmonosexual do/do not prefer one gender over others. Neither of these is more or less nonmonosexual.

… That people who are bisexual are attracted to everyone. Everyone has different criteria by which they judge whether or not someone is compatible.

… What kinds of sex people are having or how they relate to different kinds of sex. These assumptions might be based on perceptions of gender roles, or assumptions of what someone’s genitalia looks like and how it functions.

Be Careful Not To…

… Attempt to quantify “how bisexual” someone “really” is. This is related to the stereotype that people who are bi are lying or confused and sometimes satisfies a craving to categorize bi people as either “more gay” or “more straight”. People often try to do this by asking someone about their romantic or sexual behaviors. People deserve to have their privacy while having their identities respected.

… Use “Gay” as an umbrella term. Doing so invisibilizes nonmonosexuality. Example: Saying things like, “gay rights”, “gay marriage”, or “gay sex”, implies that bi people are only included when “acting gay”, i.e. when they are engaged in same- sex relationships/sexual activity. Instead, use the terms “same-gender relationship”/“other-gender relationship” instead of “gay relationship”/“straight relationship”. Relationships don’t have sexual orientations.

… Seem infatuated, fascinated or exoticizing of nonmonosexuality.

… Invisibilize bisexuality. Example: “All people are bisexual.” This dismisses people’s identities as if they are a negligible part of “human nature”.

… Ask invasive questions, or interrogate people about their sexuality. This may make the person feel like a scientific study and contribute to a sense of invalidation or isolation.

… Suggest that people who identify as bisexual inherently uphold a gender binary of woman/man. Different people think differently about their identities. Many people identify as bisexual as an act of reclaiming the word from its negative contexts. Many describe being bisexual to mean “attraction regardless of gender”, or “attraction to any gender”. Identifying with the word bisexual can also serve to connect with history and literature.

<3 Feisty Bis

(via bialogue-group)

Sep 21

fateofthecursed:

Reasons trans health care is difficult to obtain:

1. Cis normative society
2. Transphobia
3. Medical gate keepers

Things that DON’T make trans health care harder to obtain:

1. Non binary people
2. Non dysphoric trans people
3. “Fake” pronouns

hope that helps

(Source: serahfemme, via rileykonor)

nonbinarycharliedalton:

Fun fact! Trans and nonbinary people who choose not to go on hormones, get surgery, etc. are still totally valid! Nonbinary people who choose not to present as “androgynous” are still totally valid! Binary trans people who choose not to present traditionally feminine or masculine based on their gender are still totally valid!

Stop policing everyone’s identity. It isn’t difficult.

(via gayqueers)

This Year, The Government Is On Track To Deport Fewest Number Of Immigrants Since 2007 -

(Source: think-progress)

New Queer Cinema: Renegotiating 'Male Hustlers' -

rileykonor:

Ferret © Riley Konor

6” by 6”.

$15 plus $5 shipping. BUY HERE.

rileykonor:

Ferret © Riley Konor

6” by 6”.

$15 plus $5 shipping. BUY HERE.

QueerFest St. Petersburg a Success Despite Evictions, Attacks -

Turkey's First Trans Reporter Fired After Alleged Dispute Over Lipstick -

U.S. Census Will Finally Count Gay, Lesbian Families -

Grindr Responds to Reports Egyptian Cops Using App to Ensnare Gay Men -

Boys Wear Skirts to Class in Protest After School Fines Trans Girl for Wearing Skirt -

Decades of Old Research Leads to Possible HIV Vaccine For Kids -